Creating a Quality Physical Literacy Experience

These are a series of short videos (one to six minutes duration) designed to help you create a quality physical literacy experience for your participants in your practice or programs. Each video focuses on key components to assist you in understanding physical literacy and how it is important to consider in your programming implementation. Supplementary information and resources are provided after each video.

The videos are batched into two sections: Section One provides background information for developing a quality physical literacy experience and Section Two provides information to assist you in delivering a quality physical literacy experience.

These resources were developed by Sport for Life and Dr. Dean Kriellaars with support from the Government of Ontario.

Section One

Background – these videos and resources provide the necessary information for developing a Quality Physical Literacy Experience (QPLE)

Quality Physical Literacy Experiences

Creating a positive environment is essential for developing physical literacy. This entails creating the right physical space, the social setting and preparing suitable lesson plans.

Supplemental Information
Creating a Quality Physical Literacy Experience
Quality Physical Literacy Experiences
New Model for Intervention
Movement Preparation Guide

Additional Resources
Movement Preparation Click here!

Physical Literacy

This video briefly describes the essential features of physical literacy.

Supplemental Information
Physical Literacy is Crucial
IPLA Definition of PL

Additional Resources
Physical Literacy Consensus Statement Click here!

Movement Vocabulary

This video describes how your "vocabulary" is a collection of movement skills which are a foundational element of physically literate people.

Supplemental Information
FMS and Movement Vocabulary

Physical Literacy and Fundamental Movement Skills

This video describes how the basic land based movement skills (FMS) fit into the overall movement vocabulary of a person, and to physically literacy as a whole.

Supplemental Information
Movement Vocabulary
FMS and Movement Vocabulary

Physical Literacy - A Journey

Each person has a unique physical literacy journey that we help to create by supplying a QPLE.

Supplemental Information
Gateway to Active Participation
The Physical Literacy Journey

Physical Literacy, Fitness and Physical Activity

It is essential not to equate the terms physical literacy, fitness and physical activity.

Supplemental Information
Movement Vocabulary Highlight

The End Goal - Meaningful Participation

Each person has a journey, and we want it to be physical whether that is in vocation, recreation or just activities of daily living. All we really want is for a person to meaningfully be able to participate in activity.

Supplemental Information
The New Model for Intervention

Motor Competence and the Gender Gap

Motor competence is a core feature of physical literacy. Equipping children with motor competence in a diverse set of movements is key to developing PL and equipping them for the PL journey. Motor competence develops with age when a child is exposed to and participates in repetitions. Sadly, our culture does not provide for adequate repetition based learning for girls resulting in a highly undesirable gender gap.

Supplemental Information
Motor Confidence and Gender Gap
Strike with Stick
Kick Ball
Run a Square
Confidence in Performing
The Cycle
Breaking Competence
Motor Competence: Male and Female

Confidence Is Building

This video outlines the key features of creating a setting which will develop confidence in children.

Supplemental Information
Successes and Failures

Section Two

How to – these videos and resources provide the necessary information in delivering a Quality Physical Literacy Experience (QPLE)

Confidence: Failures and Successes

It is essential to help children learn about both successes and failures.

Supplemental Information
Confidence

Repetition-Based Learning

Development of movement skills and many elements of PL requires repetitions in a setting where the child can be aware of the outcome of the movement so they can self adjust their movement patterns (learn through revision). This creates a more robust nervous system capable of dealing with real life variations.

Supplemental Information
Repetition Based Learning

Explain, Demonstrate, Observe, Correct

This is a basic tenet of instruction, but it can be varied, and it is all in the details for each that creates the desired outcome of motor competence.

Supplemental Information
Explain, Demonstrate, Observe, Correct

Neuroplasticity

The brain is receptive to change at any age - hence the brain is quite "plastic." When learning new skills motor learning requires repetition based learning with knowledge of results or time on task at any age.

Supplemental Information
Repetition Based Learning

Motor Learning and Progressing Speed

Go Go Go is not the way to learn new movements. Progressing the speed of execution is key to learning a movement - Start slow work to functional speed.

Supplemental Information
Learning at Speed

Time Pressure and Peer Pressure

Learning new movement skills requires careful control of time and peer pressure for success.

Supplemental Information
Time Pressure
Peer Pressure

Instructional Cueing: When to do it

Instructional cues can be disruptive to the learning process. We often cue too much and don’t let the natural learning process engage.

Supplemental Information
Cueing During Movement

Comprehension and Mimicry

Children need to understand the terminology of movement. If they don’t know the words associated with movements, they will be less likely to participate. Children are very good mimics and just because they can exhibit the behaviors or movement doesn’t mean they know the terminology.

Supplemental Information
Movement Terminology
Mimicry

Decision Making: Selecting Movements for Circumstance

Children need settings in recreation, physical education, sport, on the playground, where they are empowered to select and sequence movement for a purpose in a variety of settings. Knowing a skill doesn’t mean you can deploy it when necessary. Decision making is required.

Selection of Movement for Environment

In real life world, people need to make decisions on how to move through complicated environments (slippery surfaces, over fences, jumping over obstacles, etc), so it is essential that we don’t just teach a movement in a benign setting but let the person explore how to use it in various settings.

Physical Literacy-Enriched Games

There are many ways to enrich existing games to create a positive experience for developing many of the elements of physical literacy. So think about how you might include awareness, selection, sequencing and modifying movement skills in the delivery of your games and activities to help improve PL of participants.

Supplemental Information
Small Sided Games with Purpose
Inclusion

Building a Physical Literacy Environment

The built environment needs to jive with the intent to get people moving. Often our spaces and rules create a non-movement culture rather than one of spatial and activity flexibility.

Additional Resources
Don't Walk in the Halls Click here!

Social Environment

The social environment is critical to consider when developing physical literacy. Fun and friends are the number 1 and 2 reasons why people stay engaged. Also, without a conducive social environment the child will not develop the ability to present themselves in front of others – a key element to participation. Audience needs to be progressed.

Supplemental Information
Audience Social Facilitation

Creativity

Development of movement creativity requires a strong base of competence in a variety of movement skills along with free play to explore movement, along with the need to construct movement sequences for a purpose.

Supplemental Information
Movement Skills

Progressing Competition with Purpose

Competition needs to be progressed in order to prepare children for the real world. It is unsuitable to apply adult competition models to children but equally inappropriate to not teach a child to compete. Rivalry is something that can be introduced and progressed to the benefit of every child. But this doesn't mean they will be in competitive sports.

Supplemental Information
Progressing Rivalry

Motor Control Errors

Reducing motor control errors through development of physical literacy helps to reduce the likelihood of injury, and increases the ability to perform movement tasks. This requires brain training and muscle training approaches.

Supplemental Information
Motor Control Errors

Movement Selection Errors

One type of error that arises is termed a selection error when a person is unable to make a choice for the right movement, or when the person is highly asymmetrical in movement resulting in avoidance of or inappropriate selection of movement for a circumstance. Reducing asymmetry in children in movement helps to minimize selection errors.

Supplemental Information
Right and Left Symmetry

Manipulation Dominance Vs. Stability Dominance

We tend to purposefully train limbs to perform manipulation tasks but rarely purposefully train limbs for stability or support roles. Both are essential for function.

Supplemental Information
Manipulation and Stabilization

 
Durability

Durabiluty is the ability to endure the physical and mental demands of active participation, and physical literacy along with fitness prepare a person to be able to train, able to work, and able to do activities of daily living for life.

Supplemental Information
Durability and PL Training

Well-Being: Physical and Mental

Mental and physical fitness arise from participation which arises from physical literacy. Physical literacy is not just physical it is cognitive, psychological and social.